SUNY COLLEGE AT OLD WESTBURY FACULTY PAGES
[home][directory]

 
     
    Judy Lloyd
    Professor and Chair

  • Dept: Chemistry & Physics
  • Building: Natural Science Building
  • Room: S206
  • Office Hours:                  Tuesday, 9:30 - 10:30 
  •    SPRING 2001             
    Thursday 4:00 - 6:00
    Other hours by appointment
  • Phone: 516-876-2728
  • E-mail: lloydj@oldwestbury.edu

 


RESEARCH ON ODD HYDROGEN SPECIES
Various forms of air pollution - acid rain, tropospheric ozone, visibility-reducing haze - are formed via atmospheric photochemistry, a set of chemical reactions initiated and enhanced by sunlight.  Our environmental chemistry research project is a study of atmospheric free radicals and peroxides that are involved in these processes. 

The free radicals OH, HO2 and RO2 feature prominently as atmospheric oxidants.  These radicals are formed during daytime in both remote and urban atmospheres through reactions with water vapor and hydrocarbons, both biogenic and anthropogenic.   Reaction with OH frequently is the first of a series of steps leading to the degradation of volatile organic compounds, and usually results in the formation of an HO2 or RO2 free radical.  When the atmosphere also contains high concentrations of NO from high temperature combustion, NO reacts with HO2 to regenerate OH.  This reaction also forms NO2.  If NO is not present, HO2 and RO2 self-react to form peroxides H2O2 and ROOH.

Why are these species - OH, HO2, H2O2 and ROOH - collectively known as odd hydrogen -  important? 
*  The only known source of tropospheric ozone, O3, is the photolysis of NO2, formed through the reactions outlined above.  O3       causes respiratory distress, and damage to natural ecosystems, crops and materials. 

Peroxides often dissolve in cloudwater droplets, and may react with dissolved gases such as SO2 to form acid rain in the form of H2SO4 that later is delivered to sites downwind.

*  When clouds evaporate, sulfate salts may be returned to the air as aerosol particles that reduce visibility and participate in further reactions.
 

What are we doing to study this problem?
We are collaborating with scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory to study these short-lived species.   Our research program has three facets:
*  Method development - design and build new instruments capable of measuring the abundance of these species in the atmosphere.

*  Field measurement - deploy our instrument at surface stations or aboard aircraft for ambient measurements.  Peroxide data from filed measurement campaigns in Nova Scotia (1993), Nashville (1995), New York City (1996), Phoenix (1998), Philadelphia (1999) and Houston (2000) are available upon request from lloydj@oldwestbury.edu. 

*  Analysis and modeling - use the measurements, together with those of other gas species, to better understand atmospheric photochemistry.
 

SPONSORS

This work has been sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program (http://gonzalo.er.anl.gov/ACP/) and the National Science Foundation, through their Research in Undergraduate Institutions and Geosciences programs.  We are grateful for this support.  Students who have participated in this project include:
 

OLD WESTBURY STUDENTS
Amin, Irum 
Blackwell, Tenya
Bolarinwa, Bisioya
Bonhomme, Marjorie
Candel, David
Green, Rupert
Haberland Andreas
Haff, Janet
Halper, Eve

Ho, Ching-Ping
Ito, Yoko
Khevelev, Marianna 
Kouassi, Lucien
Megerdichian, Paul
Mesfin, Fassil
Musa, Jibril
Patel, Samir
Urem, Michael
Woldegaber, Haimanot 

OTHER
Alaouie, Ali
Zheng, Jun


Chemist, Wyeth Rockland County
Chemist, Con Edison     Masters degree, Environmental Technology, CW Post
Navy
Masters program in Biochemistry     SUNY / Stony Brook 

Area Director, Residential Life, Old Westbury
Chief Chemist, Spectronics Corporation
Masters degree & Ph.D. program in Inorganic Chemistry   SUNY/Stony Brook
Masters degree, Environmental Engineering, Manhattan College 
Ph.D. program in Hazardous Waste Management, University of Arizona

Masters program in Education   Columbia University
Computer Programmer
Masters program   Hunter College
Masters degree, Biochemistry   Utah State University
Masters degree & Ph.D. program in Biochemistry, SUNY/Albany
Deceased
Pharmaceutical Equipment, LLC

Chemist, Warner-Lambert
 

Masters program in Environmental Science, C.W. Post  College
Ph.D. program in Marine Sciences, SUNY/Stony Brook
 


 
 

 

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

    L. Kleinman, P.H. Daum, Y.-N. Lee, L.J. Nunnermacker, S.R. Springston, J. Weinstein-Lloyd, J. Rudoph (2000) Sensitivity of Ozone Rate to Ozone Precursors,  Geophys. Res. Lett, submitted.
    L. Kleinman, P.H. Daum, D. G. Imre, J.H. Lee, Y.-N. Lee, L.J. Nunnermacker, S.R. Springston, J. Weinstein-Lloyd, L. Newman (2000) Ozone Production in the New York City Urban Plume,  J. Geophys. Res., 105,14,495-14,511.
     P.H. Daum, L.I. Kleinman, D.G. Imre, L.J. Nunnermacker, Y.-N. Lee, S.R. Springston, L. Newman,  J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, R.J. Valent, R.E. Imhoff, R.L. Tanner, J.F. Meagher (2000) Analysis of O3 formation during a stagnation episode in central TN in summer 1995, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 9107-9119. 
     Nunnermacker, L.J., D. Imre, P.H. Daum, L.I. Kleinman, Y.-N. Lee, J.H. Lee, S.R. Springston, L. Newman, J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, W.T. Luke, R. Banta, R. Alvarez,C. Senff, S. Sillman, M. holdren, G.W. Keigley and X. Zhou (1998) Characterization of the Nashville Urban Plume on July 3rd and July 18th, 1995, J. Geophys. Res. J. Geophys. Res., 103, 28, 129-28,148.
     J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, J.H. Lee, P.H. Daum, L. Kleinman, L.J. Nunnermacker, S.R. Springston, L. Newman (1998)  Measurements of peroxides and related species during the 1995 summer intensive of the Southern Oxidant Study in Nashville, TN, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 22,361-22,373.
     S. Sillman, D. He, M. Pippin, P.H. Daum, J.H. Lee, J. Weinstein-Lloyd (1998) Model correlations for ozone, reactive nitrogen and peroxides for Nashville in comparison with measurements: Implications for O3-NOx-hydrocarbon chemistry, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 22,629-22,644. 
     L.I. Kleinman, P.H. Daum, J.H. Lee, Y.-N. Lee, J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, S.R. Springston, M.Buhr, and B.T. Jobson (1998) Photochemistry of Ozone and Related Compounds over Southern Nova Scotia, J. Geophys. Res, 103, 13,519-13,529.
      L.I. Kleinman, P.H. Daum, J.H. Lee, Y.-N. Lee, L.J. Nunnermacker, S.R. Springston, J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, L. Newman, S. Sillman (1997) Dependence of ozone production on NO and hydrocarbons in the troposphere Geophys. Res. Lett., 24, 2299-2302.
     P.H. Daum; L.I. Kleinman; W. Luke; J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd; C.M. Berkowitz and K. Busness (1996) Chemical and Physical Properties of Plumes of Anthropogenic Pollutants Transported over the North Atlantic Ocean during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment, Journal of Geophysical Research, 101, 29,029-29,042.
     J. B. Weinstein-Lloyd, P. H. Daum; L. J. Nunnermacker; J. H. Lee and L. I. Kleinman (1996)  Measurement  of Peroxides and Related Species in the 1993 North Atlantic Regional Experiment, Journal of Geophysical Research, 101, 29,081-29,090.

 

RECENT PRESENTATIONS                  *UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCHERS

     Green, R.* and J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd,  Field Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide, Annual CSTEP Conference, Lake George, N.Y., April, 2000.
     Nunnermacker, L.J., J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, P.H. Daum, L.I. Kleinman, Y.-N. Lee, S.R. Springston, P.J, Klotz, L. Newman, J. Hubbe, V. Morris, G. Neuroth, P. Hyde,  Trace Gas Measurements in Phoenix, AZ, , Symposium on Atmospheric Chemistry Issues in the 21st Century, 80th Annual AMS Meeting, Long Beach, CA January 2000
     L.I. Kleinman, P.H. Daum, P. Klotz, Y.-N. Lee, L.J. Nunnermacker, S.R. Springston, J. Weinstein-Lloyd, L. Newman (2000)  Ozone Production in the Phoenix Urban Plume, Symposium on Atmospheric Chemistry Issues in the 21st Century, 80th Annual AMS Meeting, Long Beach, CA January, 2000
     T.M. Blackwell* and J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, Determination of Hydrogen Peroxide and Organic Peroxides in Solution,  New York Chemistry Students' Association (ACS Student Affiliate) 45rd Annual Undergraduate Symposium, New York, NY, May 1997.
     J. B. Weinstein-Lloyd, J.H. Lee, P. H. Daum, B.T. Jobson, D.D. Parrish, Intercomparison of Peroxide Data from the DOE G-1 and NOAA P-3 Aircraft during the 1995 Nashville SOS Study, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December, 1996.
     L.J. Nunnermacker, P.H. Daum, J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, Y.-N. Lee, S.R. Springston, L. Newman, R.J. Alvarez, A Case Study of Urban Plume Evolution in Nashville, TN, July 3, 1995,  American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December, 1996.
     J.H. Lee, P.H. Daum, J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, L. J. Nunnermacker, S.R. Springston, X. Zhou and L. Newman, An Empirical Study of Indicators for Sensitivity of O3 Formation to NOx and Reactive Organic Gases in the Nashville Urban Plume,  American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December, 1996.
     P.H. Daum, L.J. Nunnermacker, L.I. Kleinman, J.H. Lee, S.R. Springston, J.B. Weinstein-Lloyd, L. Newman, Examination of O3 Production efficiencies in the Nashville Urban Plume,  American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December, 1996.
     H. G. Woldegaber*, M. Urem* and  J. B. Weinstein-Lloyd, HPLC Analysis of Isomeric Hydroxy and Methoxybenzoic Acids Produced by Fenton Chemistry, 211th Annual Meeting of the American Chemical Society, New Orleans, LA, March, 1996.
     M. Khevelev* and J. B. Weinstein-Lloyd, Reactivity of Chemiluminescence Reagents toward Oxidants, 211th Annual Meeting of the American Chemical Society, New Orleans, LA, March, 1996.


   *UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCHERS

Author:  J. Lloyd
This page modified on: March 12, 2001
The views and opinions expressed on this page are those of the page developers and not necessarily those of the College at Old Westbury. The contents of this page have not been reviewed or approved by the College, and the College cannot accept responsibility for their contents. Any comments on the contents of this page should be directed to the developers.
 

 
[home][directory]